Critical care

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Last seen: 5 years 10 months ago
Joined: 30/04/2012 - 4:33pm
Critical care

The South Wales Critical Care Network is committed to improving end of life care for patients who are cared for in Intensive Care or High Dependency Units. I would value any contributions anyone has of experiences, pathways, stories or ideas for making dying in Critical Care a better experience for the dying and their families and loved ones. Many thanks Zoe Goodacre Network Manager, South Wales Critical Care Network @swccn

Sarah Hews
Last seen: 5 years 5 months ago
Joined: 12/10/2012 - 3:29pm
dying in Critical care

Complementary Therapy can be used to help the dying experience to be a calm and more human one.
I am a Reiki Therapist and have worked as part of a complementary therapy team at a London teaching hospital. We treated patients in critical care with Reiki, reflexology and aromatherapy, as well as their relatives.
These gentle therapies can be given to the patient in their bed without disrupting medical care. Aromastones can be safely used in this environment with aromatherapy oils paticularly suited to end of life care. We carried CD players and provided relaxing music during therapy and beyond. Relatives and patients would often say these tools had changed the whole atmosphere in the room.
Reiki particularly induces calm, peace and relaxation as well as helping with pain and anxiety. If a patient is being treated the relatives in the room often feel calmer after the treatment. Or often fall asleep! To have a gentle and healing touch in such a medical environment can be a profound experience for patients and relatives and in my experience has helped many people in critical care to have a calm, and peaceful death.

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